Tag Archives: movement therapy

Qualities of movement

Back in December we started a donation based series of workshops that were around mindful movement.
Our classes and explorations carried from breathing and posture to walking, music and rhythm. This time we will turn our focus to qualities of movement.

Our goals will be to connect to the world of emotions and feelings and express ourselves through movement. We will also, focus on qualities in the music and how those can be expressed through movement. 

Quality hides in the transition

I am not sure if you have ever felt but I definitely have… this feeling of uncertainty, of something missing even though you have performed a movement “correctly”…?
You would start off correctly, or with what would appear as correct, and end at the right spot but somehow feel like you had missed something in between. A feeling that something is not quite right, or that something was missing

So that is the feeling we will be trying to better understand… Where is it coming from and why? 
What are we really missing?

Becoming aware of the transition from point A to point B can be a way to discover more options, opportunities and qualities in our movement and I hope that you will join me in this journey on Saturday March 27th at 12pm (EST)

Pay from the Heart

This is a donation based workshop because we feel it is important to open up opportunities for people to move even if they are not Tango fans, even if they haven’t really for the last year and especially if they feel that it takes a lot of effort, physical or psychological, to move.

So we have taken down all limitations on our side and we only ask for you to contribute as much as you can, through a donation here: https://paypal.me/Bautanz?locale.x=en_US

And if you can’t contribute a monetary amount still join us, attending is another form of contribution.
So here is the link to our Zoom room for Saturday: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85966158244
Or if you prefer Facebook: https://fb.me/e/435N5uQBj

And maybe you will decide “Qualities of movement” is not for you at the moment, still subscribe for weekly movement inspired emails and future classes

Hope to see you Saturday,

Chrisa

“Movement can change your brain, too!”

For years and years we have a debate between body and brain. With different groups having strong opinions over ones power over the other; however more and more studies come to show an intimate connection between the two and bring movement to the stage!

Obvious findings through experience now backed up by science

We have all been in situation where we were feeling a bit blue, went out dancing and felt wonderful afterwards. Or where we have been feeling stressed and went to the gym to let some steam off.

Now there are numerous studies that show that movement, in different forms, aerobic exercise, resistance, flexibility, and balance exercises, Yoga, Qigong and Dance have an effect in the function of our brain. It “modulates stress reactivity and anxiety in humans.” , “increases endogenous opioid activity in the central and peripheral nervous system and may induce a euphoric state and reduce pain” , “boosts mood by increasing a brain protein called BDNF that helps nerve fibers grow.”

Specifically for movement practices where one is required to pay close attention to bodily sensations, position in space and feelings research has shown that such practices are useful adjunctive components to other treatment as they create the alleviation of depressive symptoms. See for example this interesting paper on Yoga practice and PTSD

Dance as a movement practice can have surprising benefits

The above links can surely give you an idea of what scientists mean when they say that change of posture, breathing and rhythm can have a positive change to your brain in various ways.

Dance, which is movement in synchrony with others can have further surprising benefits to “an individual’s self-esteem and their feelings of social connection with a partner.” The results of this study came to show that “individuals felt better about themselves following a period of synchronous compared to asynchronous movement, while they also perceived a greater self-other overlap with their partner.”

This for many of us might come as no surprise. I am sure we all have experienced the both ends of this spectrum of synchrony and asychnony. When in full synchrony with our partner we feel great. When fighting for synchrony for 12mins of a tanda we feel just terrible

In the same paper previous literature is referenced to have noted that “bouts of synchronous activity have been shown to increase cooperation , encourage compliance and conformist behaviour, boost trust, facilitate joint-action capabilities, enhance person memory, and promote compassion and altruism.(…) synchronous action can lead to perceptions of connectedness and the blurring of self-other boundaries between interaction partners. In general, experiencing interpersonal synchrony is seen to establish the common ground on which effective social interactions unfold.”

What I think we all might find interesting here is that communities around the world knew about this already; an experiential knowing that created folk dances, rituals and various other community activities that involve moving together.

Also, movers from various disciplines have described all of the above as firstly our movement informing our knowing. Secondly through discovering ourselves we discover more the other and the world and become more compassionate towards them, towards us.

Moving together is what I am missing

A friend asked me the other day: “Don’t you miss dancing?”
I was torn to tell you the truth… I couldn’t quite tell if I missed it or not.

On one hand I am now used to not having a milonga to go to…And I certainly don’t miss the action of dancing, of moving…

We have the Mid-week Tango practice and Online classes, plus my personal fitness schedule. So I am moving and dancing… What I do miss though is dancing with someone. Synchronizing my movement with other people.

Interestingly enough though all hope is not lost even in this crazy world we live in. In the experiment conducted as part of the research paper linked above, participants had to connect through a video link and perform arm-curls with their partner over the screen. Some were asked to synchronize their movement and some to avoid synchronization. The group of people who synchronized after the experiment reported a higher self-esteem and better connected to their partner.

People who live alone at this time isolation have suffered mentally much more than the rest of us. Can we virtually replace a hug? Surely not!
But maybe there are better ways to connect that we haven’t found yet, that we haven’t explored yet. Maybe there are ways to make these platforms and virtual environments more welcoming, more real…

Who knows..! I guess if we keep on moving and we will see what we can discover!

😉

Chrisa