focus

4 Key Focus Points for Your Practice

In our last practice, we covered a lot of content and introduced several exciting concepts during the session. To help you make the most of the recording, I wanted to share four key focus points with you. This way, if you want to dive deeper into a specific concept, you can easily find the relevant parts of the video. Happy learning!

So let’s go right into it

Upper and Lower Body Coordination – The Key to Happy Dances.

First the recording itself; this is the video of the whole practice for you to watch and follow along.
This practice will guide you in understanding how your body plays a vital role in executing Tango’s rules, all while ensuring your safety and preventing any discomfort or frustration on the dance floor. 

4 Key Elements of Focus:

  1. Rebuilding the Embrace (12:09 – 35:26)
    We are leading and following through the arms. Now be careful, not “with the arms” but through the arms. We need to pay attention to how we position our arms, so that the forces between us and our partner flow through our bodies and connect with our legs. TIt’s also important to consider how our body adjusts when our partner applies pressure or pulls us. The goal is to make our entire body an active part of the leading and following process, rather than just relying on our frame.
  2. Connecting the dots (42:48 – 49:06)
    Our body is a remarkable interconnected system. In today’s session, we’re focusing on the back fascial line, as highlighted by Tom Myers in, Anatomy Trains. But why does this matter? By recognizing the interdependence of various body parts, we can reduce the effort required to control them during movement. We’re creating a seamless system where one movement naturally flows into the next, allowing us to fully embrace and enjoy our dances.
  3. Buoyancy in your movement (49:12 – 54:06)
    Imagine your body is wrapped in a comfortable and flexible hammock. There every movement you make applies a gentle force that ripples through its fabric. As you exert force on one side, the other sides adapt and mold to accommodate. And when you release the force the whole body floats back to its initial position, with buoyancy and comfort instead of you pushing and pulling things together. 
  4. A Tango Drill (56:00 – 1:03)
    This drill sets the focus on our walks. It is intended to put these concepts we worked on above in a Tango perspective. If you are looking for a quick practice drill, you can just do this and be sure you are building on some good habits.

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